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animals nature veganism

Welcome to animals, nature, veganism. We are raised in a society where animal captivity, exploitation and cruelty are normalized to the point where most do not question the morality or injustice of it all.

Through no fault of our own, we are (often) raised contributing to animal injustice and to believe that it is ‘normal’ to participate in acts such as consuming animal products or visiting captive wildlife - which should not to be confused with ‘common’, as it is by percentage ‘common’ to participate in anti-animal acts, but it is by no means normal.

In the words of Optimus Prime, freedom is the right of all sentient beings.

Note: every post I make is always categorised to either 'animals', 'nature' or 'veganism'. Feel free to search the tags for your topic of interest.

http://youtu.be/0ANN1xfnGK0

Jul 22 '14

Anonymous asked:

Adolf Hitler was a vegetarian.

plant-strong:

Except that he almost definitely wasn’t. And Einstein was. And Newton was. And Da Vinci was.

And if he had been, so what? Hitler wore socks. Are we to say that all people who wear socks are Hitler? He had a dog. Are all dog owners Hitler? He liked to paint. Are all painters Hitler?

Meanwhile, Pol Pot ate meat. Genghis Khan ate meat. Stalin ate meat. I’m assuming you’re willing to draw comparisons between yourself and these people, yes?

Try harder, buddy.

Jul 21 '14

Anonymous asked:

What are some ingredients/chemicals I should avoid?

adviceforvegans:

List of things to avoid as a vegan :)

Jul 21 '14

(Source: vive-veg)

Jul 21 '14

(Source: kady-xvx)

Jul 21 '14
Jul 21 '14
Jul 19 '14
art-and-anarchism:

Tale of two cows… The veg anarchist version

art-and-anarchism:

Tale of two cows… The veg anarchist version

Jul 19 '14

voicesofthedistantsea:

When SeaWorld says a thing that we all know ain’t true
image

(Source: mexicanest)

Jul 14 '14

Enchanted River - Phillipines 
 Enchanted River is found in the Phillipines. It is called “enchanted” because no one has ever reached its bottom. Many people, including scuba divers have tried reaching for the bottom but have failed, hence the legend of its bottomless pit. Moreover, locals share that NOBODY has been successful in catching the fish in this river, whether by hand or by spear.  They say its bluish color is a result of its depth and the water clarity changes throughout the day. At around 12:00pm, the water becomes clearer and even more majestic.”

Enchanted River - Phillipines


Enchanted River is found in the Phillipines. It is called “enchanted” because no one has ever reached its bottom. Many people, including scuba divers have tried reaching for the bottom but have failed, hence the legend of its bottomless pit. Moreover, locals share that NOBODY has been successful in catching the fish in this river, whether by hand or by spear.
They say its bluish color is a result of its depth and the water clarity changes throughout the day. At around 12:00pm, the water becomes clearer and even more majestic.”

(Source: sumpunkkidwithtattoos)

Jul 14 '14
allthingsprimate:

Monkey World - Ape Rescue Centre (Dorset, UK)
Just under a week ago I was fortunate enough to go on my third ever visit to primate rescue centre Monkey World, located in south-west England and home to over 240 primates. I have been meaning to write up a post about it here for a while now because quite frankly the place is just brilliant, both simply as a day out and as a centre for primate rescue, rehabilitation and conservation.
It is home to a variety of primates rescued from a range of backgrounds including the pet trade, usage as photographers’ props and laboratory testing. Needless to say many of these animals have suffered appalling levels of cruelty and neglect, and belong to species which are becoming increasingly endangered in the wild. Where Monkey World comes in however is to provide a refuge for these primates to live in a safe but stimulating environment where they can also act as ambassadors for the conservation of their species.
Although of course the primates’ physical, social and psychological needs are the priority, I love how the centre strikes a balance between their interests and those of their human visitors. The primate care staff are clearly incredibly knowledgeable and passionate about the animals in their care, providing them with lots of love and enrichment whilst also finding time to deliver fascinating and entertaining talks to visitors.
During my visit I listened to talks about the complex politics of chimps (Monkey World being home to the largest group of chimpanzees outside Africa); the difficulties of looking after a breeding population of Wooly monkeys; how one of their gibbons learnt that it was highly amusing to pee on the visitors, and about the strong bond between one of the primate care staff (himself from Borneo) and the group of orangutans (who, incidentally, enjoy being sprayed with baby oil in the absence of the natural humidity of their rainforest home). 
They are also closely linked to the Endangered Asian Species Trust and contribute to the running of the Dao Tien Endangered Primate Species Centre in Cat Tien National Park, Southern Vietnam.
Overall the  centre does some incredibly work and if you are able to visit I would strongly recommend it. All the information about the centre and its inhabitants can be found on its website where it is also possible to adopt any of the primates in its care.  

allthingsprimate:

Monkey World - Ape Rescue Centre (Dorset, UK)

Just under a week ago I was fortunate enough to go on my third ever visit to primate rescue centre Monkey World, located in south-west England and home to over 240 primates. I have been meaning to write up a post about it here for a while now because quite frankly the place is just brilliant, both simply as a day out and as a centre for primate rescue, rehabilitation and conservation.

It is home to a variety of primates rescued from a range of backgrounds including the pet trade, usage as photographers’ props and laboratory testing. Needless to say many of these animals have suffered appalling levels of cruelty and neglect, and belong to species which are becoming increasingly endangered in the wild. Where Monkey World comes in however is to provide a refuge for these primates to live in a safe but stimulating environment where they can also act as ambassadors for the conservation of their species.

Although of course the primates’ physical, social and psychological needs are the priority, I love how the centre strikes a balance between their interests and those of their human visitors. The primate care staff are clearly incredibly knowledgeable and passionate about the animals in their care, providing them with lots of love and enrichment whilst also finding time to deliver fascinating and entertaining talks to visitors.

During my visit I listened to talks about the complex politics of chimps (Monkey World being home to the largest group of chimpanzees outside Africa); the difficulties of looking after a breeding population of Wooly monkeys; how one of their gibbons learnt that it was highly amusing to pee on the visitors, and about the strong bond between one of the primate care staff (himself from Borneo) and the group of orangutans (who, incidentally, enjoy being sprayed with baby oil in the absence of the natural humidity of their rainforest home). 

They are also closely linked to the Endangered Asian Species Trust and contribute to the running of the Dao Tien Endangered Primate Species Centre in Cat Tien National Park, Southern Vietnam.

Overall the  centre does some incredibly work and if you are able to visit I would strongly recommend it. All the information about the centre and its inhabitants can be found on its website where it is also possible to adopt any of the primates in its care.  

Jul 12 '14

skunkbear:

Here’s an Otocolobus manulnature’s Grumpy Cat — discovering a camera trap outside it’s den. Camera traps are used by biologists to lean about rare animals’ behavior, abundance, and health — just by setting up a solar-powered camera with a motion trigger. No physical trapping necessary.

O. manul (also known as Pallas’s cat) is about the size of a house cat, but you’ll notice has round pupils instead of slits. It lives in western China and the steppes of Central Asia.

You’d think that Pallas’s cat would rule the internet by now - but there aren’t too many photos of them because they are both rare and shy. The IUCN lists them as near-threatened. Just another reason to support species conservation!

You can see the whole video — posted Scarce Worldwidehere.

Jul 12 '14
scienceandstuff:

Why whale poo could be the secret to reversing the effects of climate change

A new scientific report from the University of Vermont, which gathers together several decades of research, shows that the great whales which nearly became extinct in the 20th century – and are now recovering in number due to the 1983 ban on whaling – may be the enablers of massive carbon sinks via their prodigious production of faeces.

Not only do the nutrients in whale poo feed other organisms, from phytoplankton upwards – and thereby absorb the carbon we humans are pumping into the atmosphere – even in death the sinking bodies of these massive animals create new resources on the sea bed, where entire species exist solely to graze on rotting whale. There’s an additional and direct benefit for humans, too. Contrary to the suspicions of fishermen that whales take their catch, cetacean recovery could “lead to higher rates of productivity in locations where whales aggregate to feed and give birth”. Their fertilizing faeces here, too, would encourage phytoplankton which in turn would encourage healthier fisheries.
(Read more…)

scienceandstuff:

Why whale poo could be the secret to reversing the effects of climate change

new scientific report from the University of Vermont, which gathers together several decades of research, shows that the great whales which nearly became extinct in the 20th century – and are now recovering in number due to the 1983 ban on whaling – may be the enablers of massive carbon sinks via their prodigious production of faeces.

Not only do the nutrients in whale poo feed other organisms, from phytoplankton upwards – and thereby absorb the carbon we humans are pumping into the atmosphere – even in death the sinking bodies of these massive animals create new resources on the sea bed, where entire species exist solely to graze on rotting whale. There’s an additional and direct benefit for humans, too. Contrary to the suspicions of fishermen that whales take their catch, cetacean recovery could “lead to higher rates of productivity in locations where whales aggregate to feed and give birth”. Their fertilizing faeces here, too, would encourage phytoplankton which in turn would encourage healthier fisheries.

(Read more…)

Jul 11 '14
be-their-sound:

ninjafirefox:

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO!
these tigers are not a separate breed! One was found in a litter and they have since been inbred to extremes to attract tourists. Inbreeding causes genetic defects that can sometimes be life threatening, all for money.
http://bigcatrescue.org/abuse-issues/issues/white-tigers/
Hey Betheirsound, can you back me up?

I sure can.
This is a genetic mutation, not a species of animal. Most tigers with this mutation are Bengal (or Bengal hybrids with Amur ancestry), and all are captive. I repeat, this is NOT an endangered species, it is a rare gene. Animals may carry the gene but not express it, and there have been cases of Bengal tigers in the wild exhibiting this mutation, although none recently. 
“Though golden tabby tigers are not deliberately bred for by conservation-minded zoos, they have joined the white tiger in becoming popular for use in stage shows and similar events. A few private breeders are attempting to produce golden tabby tigers alongside white tigers to meet.”
No one should be focused on breeding for a genetic mutation. All breeding efforts should be for conservation with intent to release. 
nowyoukno constantly posts things that are misleading or downright incorrect. Always fact check their posts, and let them know if you see something amiss. They may not have intended to imply these animals needed protection, or that they were a species. However they should’ve been more clear.

be-their-sound:

ninjafirefox:

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO!

these tigers are not a separate breed! One was found in a litter and they have since been inbred to extremes to attract tourists. Inbreeding causes genetic defects that can sometimes be life threatening, all for money.

http://bigcatrescue.org/abuse-issues/issues/white-tigers/

Hey Betheirsound, can you back me up?

I sure can.

This is a genetic mutation, not a species of animal. Most tigers with this mutation are Bengal (or Bengal hybrids with Amur ancestry), and all are captive. I repeat, this is NOT an endangered species, it is a rare gene. Animals may carry the gene but not express it, and there have been cases of Bengal tigers in the wild exhibiting this mutation, although none recently. 

Though golden tabby tigers are not deliberately bred for by conservation-minded zoos, they have joined the white tiger in becoming popular for use in stage shows and similar events. A few private breeders are attempting to produce golden tabby tigers alongside white tigers to meet.”

No one should be focused on breeding for a genetic mutation. All breeding efforts should be for conservation with intent to release. 

nowyoukno constantly posts things that are misleading or downright incorrect. Always fact check their posts, and let them know if you see something amiss. They may not have intended to imply these animals needed protection, or that they were a species. However they should’ve been more clear.

Jul 11 '14

hannahforhope:

huffingtonpost:

This Gertjie, the orphaned baby rhino, is scared to sleep alone at night after his mother was killed by poachers. Learn about this cuties tragic story here.

#rhino #animalrights #poaching

Jul 10 '14
mostlycatsmostly:

Not my work, but this should be helpful to many people.

mostlycatsmostly:

Not my work, but this should be helpful to many people.